Video #6 – TBIs

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can mess up how the brain works. They are a major cause of death and disability in the United States. are usually caused by an external force like a brutal blow to the head.

One of the most common causes of TBIs comes from sports injuries, falls or assaults, but auto accidents or even coming up too quickly from underneath a open cabinet door can cause the problem.

The symptoms of a TBI can be immediate like a loss or consciousness from several minutes to hours, but they can also be overlooked, the symptoms being delayed by hours or several days. Some of the more common symptoms may include blurred vision, nausea and vomiting, confusion, and/or difficulties concentrating.

 

 

Questions

 

  1. A traumatic brain injury TBI may be related to
  2. Autonomic dysfunction
  3. Balance issues
  4. Difficulty waking from sleep
  5. All the above

 

  1. A properly delivered chiropractic adjustment can help a TBI victim be more
  2. Alert
  3. Restless
  4. Argumentative
  5. All the above

 

  1. The ability for a muscle to meet the demands of manual muscle testing is related to
  2. Neurological disorders
  3. Vestibular disorders
  4. Autonomic stability
  5. All the above

 

  1. Tapping the insertion of the rectus femoris should properly cause
  2. An inhibition of the rectus femoris ipsilaterally
  3. A facilitation of the rectus femoris contralaterally
  4. A facilitation of the rectus femoris ipsilaterally
  5. Any of the above

 

  1. Gapping the TMJ with a tongue depressor has the potential to cause
  2. The normalization of the lower extremities
  3. The normalization of the upper extremities
  4. The normalization of autonomic responses
  5. All the above

 

 

  1. A hamstring muscle that is unable to meet the demands of manual muscle testing is commonly related to
  2. A sacral subluxation
  3. A cervical subluxation
  4. A metatarsal subluxation
  5. All the above

 

  1. Which of the following statements is not true: Caution must be applied when combining chiropractic adjustments and massage on all patients?
  2. Especially patients with traumatic brain injuries
  3. Because excessive stimulation may exceed the metabolic capacity of the neurons
  4. Because it may increase neuronal damage
  5. This issue is not clinically significant

 

  1. The downside of making the brain work better is the
  2. Increased production of free radicals
  3. Increased sensitivity to sensations
  4. Increased recognition of pain
  5. All the above

 

  1. A traumatic brain injury can
  2. Decrease ability to control digestion
  3. Enhance balance issues
  4. Improve vision issues
  5. Expand balance and stability

 

  • A proper chiropractic examination should include
  1. Assessment of the patient’s overall condition
  2. Evaluate the patient’s movement patterns
  3. Manual muscle testing as functional neurology
  4. All the above

 

  • The heel-toe gait test evaluates the patient’s ability to
    1. Touch their heel to their opposite toe
    2. Know where their heel and toe are on their body
    3. Walk forward in a deliberate manner
    4. Walk forward placing their heel to their contralateral toe

 

  • Turning the head to one side when testing the opposite proximal rectus femoris should display
    1. Conditional inhibition of that rectus femoris
    2. Conditional facilitation of the ipsilateral rectus femoris
    3. Conditional facilitation of that rectus femoris
    4. Turing the head has nothing to do with the contralateral rectus femoris

 

 

  • Turning the head to one side when testing the clavicular portion of the pectoralis major (PMC) should cause
    1. Conditional inhibition of the contralateral PMC
    2. Conditional facilitation of the contralateral PCMC
    3. Conditional facilitation of the ipsilateral PMC
    4. Turning the head should cause all these changes

 

  • Turning the head to one side when testing the opposite latissimus dorsi should display
  1. Conditional inhibition of that latissimus dorsi
  2. Conditional inhibition of the ipsilateral latissimus dorsi
  3. Conditional facilitation of the latissimus dorsi
  4. Turing the head has nothing to do with the latissimus dorsi

 

  • Using a tuning fork during the exam tests
    1. Vibratory sensation
    2. The patient’s ability to hear through bone
    3. The ipsilateral thalamus
    4. All the above

 

  • The optokinetic tape tests
    1. The patient’s sensitivity to dizziness
    2. Involuntary eye movements
    3. The patient’s vision
    4. The patient’s ability to see color

 

  • There appears to be a brain effect to biting
    1. It causes jaw soreness
    2. It can correct many symptoms of motor syndromes
    3. When done so hard that teeth crack
    4. All the above

 

  • We should always treat patients as individuals because they have different
    1. Perceptions of nociception
    2. Body systems
    3. Different pain thresholds
    4. All the above

 

  • A dysfunctional asymmetric tonic neck reflex is indicated when there is
    1. Facilitation of an extensor muscle contralateral to the head turn
    2. Inhibition of an extensor muscle ipsilateral to the head turn
    3. Facilitation of an extensor muscle ipsilateral to the head turn
    4. The asymmetric tonic neck reflex does not affect extensor muscles

 

 

  • The following organs are especially susceptible to a blast injury as one from an explosive incendiary device (EID):
    1. Ears
    2. Stomach and lungs
    3. Intestines
    4. All the above

 

  • A blast injury can affect organs surrounded by fluid, like the
    1. Brain
    2. Spinal cord
    3. Knees
    4. A and B above

 

  • The victim of an explosive event can be predisposed to later development of
    1. Alzheimer’s disease
    2. Parkinson’s disease
    3. Anxiety and depression
    4. All the above

 

  • When a blast wave reaches its victim that person may suffer the effects of
  1. Blunt force trauma
  2. Axonal shearing
  3. Contrecoup
  4. All the above

 

  • Axonal shearing or diffuse axonal injury is when
    1. Areas of brain tissue with varying density slide over each other at different speeds
    2. Various axons experience tremendous shearing forces
    3. Shearing forces cause axons to stretch and tear from the cell body
    4. All the above

 

  • Axonal shearing and brain injury
    1. Can continue for hours or days after the initial injury
    2. Will be healed after a good night’s sleep
    3. Can be healed by taking specific vitamins and/or minerals
    4. Is time dependent and the victim will be healed quickly

 

  • Axonal shearing happens when
    1. The soft fragile tissues of the brain are slammed against the hard jagged surfaces of the skull
    2. White and gray matter have different densities and therefore travel across each other at different speeds
    3. The axons may be completely, partially torn or separated from their connections with other cells
    4. All the above

 

 

  • Brain fatigue may be the result of a blast injury
    1. Because the victim sustains an energy deficit
    2. Causing muscle synchronization and coordination issue
    3. Results in a body fatigue
    4. All the above

 

  • Body fatigue and coordination deficits can lead to
    1. Muscle strain or over-work can be related to neck and back pain
    2. Headaches
    3. Syncope
    4. All the above

 

  • If we can improve brain function
    1. 10% of cortical outflow goes to muscles and their coordination
    2. 90% of cortical outflow modulates autonomic performance
    3. Muscle and autonomic performance should improve
    4. All the above
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